Conclusions from ENA observations from HSTOF: The heliosphere has a tail and is asymmetrical!
Our research

Magnetic field strongly disturbs the motion of electrically charged particles in space but neutral atoms are insensitive to magnetic forces and consequently they move freely in all directions. This is true also for energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the heliosphere.

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A corridor to the Sun for select nanodust particles
Our research

The smallest dust grains in the circumsolar dust cloud are the nanodust particles, i.e., the dust grains with the sizes of a few to a few tens millionth parts of millimeter. They are so small they include just several dozen thousands of atoms.

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The heliosphere is not round!
Our research

The heliosphere is a region in the interstellar space filled with the solar wind plasma, emitted by the Sun. Since the Sun is traversing a partly ionized, magnetized cloud of interstellar gas, the solar wind expansion must be eventually arrested at a certain distance to the Sun. This happens in the locations where the solar wind pressure becomes equal to the pressure of the interstellar matter. Ultimately, however, the solar wind matter cannot accumulate infinitely inside the heliosphere and must find an exit path to the interstellar space. But where exactly is this path located? And is there just one evacuation path or more? These questions cannot be answered directly because up to now there have been just two active space probes – Voyager 1 and 2 – to reach the boundary regions of the heliosphere, and this happened in the regions least suspect of being anywhere close to the solar wind evacuation path. Therefore, answering these question can only be done by remote-sensing measurements and theoretical modeling.

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Pickup ion-induced magnetic waves observed by the Voyager spacecraft beyond Pluto
Our research

Interplanetary space is filled with magnetized plasma from the Sun (the solar wind) and interstellar gas, mainly hydrogen and helium, which continuously flows through the heliosphere. The interstellar atoms are ionized by extreme ultraviolet radiation and the solar wind. In result of ionization of the interstellar atoms, new ions in the solar wind are created.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 22 August 2018 13:39
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NASA selects mission to study the boundary of the heliosphere: CBK PAN is a part of the winning team!
Our research

CBK PAN will participate in a NASA space mission Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP), scheduled for launch in 2024. The selection of the winning proposal submitted in response to the Announcement of Opportunity released in 2017, was announced in Washington DC on June 1, 2018 (https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-selects-mission-to-study-solar-wind-boundary-of-outer-solar-system).

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 October 2018 13:13
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Our research

our research

Magnetic field strongly disturbs the motion of electrically charged particles in space but neutral atoms are insensitive to magnetic forces and consequently they move freely in all directions. This is true also for energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the heliosphere.

Read more...

The smallest dust grains in the circumsolar dust cloud are the nanodust particles, i.e., the dust grains with the sizes of a few to a few tens millionth parts of millimeter. They are so small they include just several dozen thousands of atoms.

Read more...

Interplanetary space is filled with magnetized plasma from the Sun (the solar wind) and interstellar gas, mainly hydrogen and helium, which continuously flows through the heliosphere. The interstellar atoms are ionized by extreme ultraviolet radiation and the solar wind. In result of ionization of the interstellar atoms, new ions in the solar wind are created.

Read more...

The heliosphere is a region in the interstellar space filled with the solar wind plasma, emitted by the Sun. Since the Sun is traversing a partly ionized, magnetized cloud of interstellar gas, the solar wind expansion must be eventually arrested at a certain distance to the Sun. This happens in the locations where the solar wind pressure becomes equal to the pressure of the interstellar matter. Ultimately, however, the solar wind matter cannot accumulate infinitely inside the heliosphere and must find an exit path to the interstellar space. But where exactly is this path located? And is there just one evacuation path or more? These questions cannot be answered directly because up to now there have been just two active space probes – Voyager 1 and 2 – to reach the boundary regions of the heliosphere, and this happened in the regions least suspect of being anywhere close to the solar wind evacuation path. Therefore, answering these question can only be done by remote-sensing measurements and theoretical modeling.

Read more...

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